Why Cyber Monday Is More Awesome Than Black Friday

Man holing tablet and touching screen.

Cyber Monday is way better than Black Friday.

 

At least, that’s what Cody would say.

 

Imagine this scenario: It’s dark, cold, and early on the morning of Black Friday. You’ve been sitting outside the Best Buy door for six months (or at least that’s how long it feels).

 

After all that time waiting in the cold for the deal of the century, the cold and darkness have done strange things to your brain. No longer are you simply excited to enjoy a new computer for the best price available: now, you’re ravenous for it. You look behind you, and everyone else in line has that same hungry look in their eyes, and suddenly you know that if you make the slightest misstep, they will overtake you and pilfer your prize.

 

The door clicks; it is now unlocked.

 

You exhale once and lower your shoulder at the door, which swings open and knocks down a display mannequin that had been barring the way. You hear the others trample the mannequin, and some of them trip over it, but this is no concern of yours. You are in the lead for that laptop, and there’s not an object or living thing on the great green earth that could stop you from full-on sprinting to where it’s displayed in the back corner.

 

There’s only one problem, though: that mannequin wasn’t a mannequin. It was Cody, a Best Buy worker just trying to open the door for the crowd, curled up into a ball and possibly sucking his thumb as human beings tried to turn him into a modern-day Mufasa.

 

Black Friday: Not for the Faint of Heart

 

The Best Buy story is a true story, and it should tell us all one thing: Black Friday has gotten a tad out of control.

 

To be fair, the deals on Black Friday are called doorbusters for a reason. They’re likely the best deals you’ll find all year, anywhere, on certain items.

 

But as we’ve seen, the major downside is the absolute chaos that the day’s environments produce. Some of us are wired to love that type of adrenaline-filled experience. As long as you’re not trampling your fellow man or woman, there’s nothing wrong with that.

 

Many of us, however, lack the assertiveness it takes to thrive in an atmosphere where the clock is ticking and everyone is gunning for the same items. Not to mention the amount of time and effort it takes to wait for stores to open or even to drive out anywhere around the holiday time.

 

On top of all that, you can easily overspend in the frenzy. The aforementioned ticking clock can lead you to buy what’s in front of you simply because someone else might buy it if you don’t. You may not even truly need or want the item, and even if you do, you likely won’t have the time to compare prices at your leisure in the store.

 

Cyber Monday: Livin’ That Couch Life

Man holding tablet. Enter Cyber Monday, which offers a polar opposite experience to its close cousin.

 

Instead of fighting actual elbows to get to an item, you can open a computer or phone screen at your own convenience and take in all the deals while a soundtrack of smooth jazz carries you along from your home speakers. Since it’s an entirely digital experience, you can pay for items wherever you would like: at work, at home on the couch, in your jammies, or at internet cafes, which probably still exist somewhere.

 

Cyber Monday has steadily seen several billions of dollars in spending for the past few years, so it’s a force in its own right. And the appeal of the day goes beyond the convenience of the shopping environment.

 

Here are a few more reasons that Cyber Monday is a great day to do your holiday shopping.

 

You Can Easily Compare Prices

 

While there are some items with a limited quantity available online, for the most part you don’t need to worry about items running out of stock. The shipping demand can easily be met by merchants.

 

That means you don’t need to stress over tossing the right item into your cart. You can take your time, breathe, and actually shop prices within the same eCommerce store, or even elsewhere.

 

The beautiful thing about online shopping is that other “stores” are one tab or click away. No need to drive from building to building. You can just glance at the same item somewhere else and have the better price in a matter of seconds.

 

You Can Cast a Wider Net

 

A closely related benefit of Cyber Monday is that you can buy a more diverse range of items.

 

This is especially beneficial if you’re doing all of your holiday shopping at once. Aunt Susan wants a Log Cabin-scented candle, while Dad wants a ticket to his favorite band’s reunion tour, and your sister Fannie Mae (whose name is classic and never-out-of-style, as she defensively reminds everyone) wants a pet snake.

 

Good luck finding all of those items running around on Black Friday.

 

Cyber Monday, on the other hand, is the perfect day for eclectic, wide-ranging deals, ensuring that you get what everybody wants at slashed prices.

 

Instant Gratification, Schminstant Gratification

 

Some out there admit that Cyber Monday is nice and all, but they say that today’s Americans are far too antsy to patiently experience delayed gratification five to seven business days after ordering things.

 

What do they know, am I right? Be strong, friends! We’re all mature adults who can wait for the trinkets we want to play with . . . aren’t we?

 

In fact, delayed gratification produces endurance, which builds character, and I’m starting to sound like your Grandpappy, and this might not be as much of a benefit as the first two so I’m going to stop while I’m (not at all) ahead.

 

Conclusion

 

Even though we’ve been bashing Black Friday a bit, here, it’s all for fun. Black Friday deals are great, and the adrenaline-filled atmosphere is an experience that many people don’t want to give up, nor should they.

 

But for those of you who enjoyed a more calculated, peaceful shopping experience, Cyber Monday is for you.

 

And, heaven knows, it’s for Cody, too.


By: Ryan Drawdy
November 27, 2017


The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official opinion or suggestions of CenterState Bank.